Those who died in the Great War.......

1914-1918 Price's Honours Board

Bartlett, James Wm.  RN
Cherquer, Henry  Hants
Conlan, Arthur U. R. Irish
Foster, Eric  Hants
Hynes, Patrick E. East Kent att. RFC
Mather, Kenneth  Canadians
Millard,  Harold RE
Packham, Eric F. Hants
Pearce, Harold J. AIF
Plummer, William A. Hants
Sims Oswald Follet Hants
Thomas, John Boaz RFC
Wellstead, Gordon  Hants (actually Wilts)

Displayed at Westbury Museum is the Price's Honours Board for 1914-1918. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission maintains a searchable register of all those who were lost and may be found at http://www.cwgc.org/

In Memory of

WILLIAM JAMES BARTLETT

Engine Room Artificer 4th Class
M/2617
H.M.S. "Black Prince.", Royal Navy
who died on
Wednesday, 31st May 1916. Age 20.

Additional Information: Son of Walter James Bartlett, of Maylings Brickyard, Fareham.

Commemorative Information

Memorial: PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Hampshire, United Kingdom
Grave Reference/
Panel Number:
15.
Location: The Memorial is situated on Southsea Common overlooking the promenade, and is accessible at all times.

In Memory of

ARTHUR UNDERHILL CONLAN

Second Lieutenant
18th Bn., London Regt (London Irish Rifles)
who died on
Monday, 22nd May 1916.

Commemorative Information

Memorial: ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France
Grave Reference/
Panel Number:
Bay 10
Location: The Arras Memorial is in the Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery, which is in the Boulevard du General de Gaulle in the western part of the town of Arras. The cemetery is near the Citadel, approximately 2 kilometres due west of the railway station. The Memorial commemorates almost 35,000 casualties of the British, New Zealand and South African Forces who died between Spring 1916 and 7th August 1918, with the exception of casualties of the Battle of Cambrai in 1917, and who have no known grave. The design, by Sir Edwin Lutyens, consists of a cloister, 25 feet high and 380 feet long, built up on Doric columns and faces west. In the broader part of the site the colonnade returns to form a recessed and open court, terminated by an apse. The names of the casualties are carved on stone panels fixed to the cloister walls.

Historical Information: The Memorial commemorates almost 35,000 casualties of the British, New Zealand and South African Forces who died between Spring 1916 and 7th August 1918, excluding casualties of the Battle of Cambrai in 1917, and who have no known grave. The design, by Sir Edwin Lutyens, consists of a cloister built upon Doric columns and faces west. In the broader part of the site the colonnade returns to form a recessed and open court, terminated by an apse in front of which is the Arras Flying Services Memorial. The names of the casualties are carved on stone panels which are fixed to the cloister walls.

In Memory of

ERNIE ERIC FOSTER

Serjeant
26924
15th Bn., Hampshire Regiment
who died on
Thursday, 7th June 1917. Age 22.

Additional Information: Son of Mrs. Mary Ann Foster, of 18, Aylesbury Rd., Copnor, Portsmouth.

Commemorative Information

Memorial: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Grave Reference/
Panel Number:
Panel 35
Location: Ypres (now Ieper) is a town in the Province of West Flanders. The Memorial is situated at the eastern side of the town on the road to Menin (Menen) and Courtrai (Kortrijk).

 

In Memory of

ERNEST STANLEY PATRICK HYNES

Lieutenant
25th Sqdn., Royal Flying Corps
and, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)
who died on
Friday, 10th November 1916. Age 18.

Additional Information: Son of Harry H. and Edith Hynes.

Commemorative Information

Cemetery: LAPUGNOY MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France
Grave Reference/
Panel Number:
II. F. 1.
Location: Lapugnoy is a village 6 kilometres west of Bethune. From the centre of Lapugnoy, head south-west on the D70 in the direction of Marles-les-Mines. On the outskirts there is a crucifix at the side of the main road, turn right here towards Allouagne. After approximately 500 metres there is a track on the left hand side (the Cemetery is signposted here) and the Cemetery can be found on the left hand side, approximately 500 metres, along this track.

Historical Information: The Cemetery site was chosen in the summer of 1915, in preparation for the coming British offensive; and the first burials took place in September, in Plot I, the furthest from the road. Plot II was not filled until 1917; but in April, 1917, the Battles of Arras began and the Cemetery had reached the road by the middle of September. Fresh plots were then made on the West side, from the road, almost as far back as the Southern boundary. The dead were brought from the Casualty Clearing Stations at Lapugnoy and Lozinghem (chiefly the 18th and the 23rd), except between May and August, 1918, when fighting units buried in this Cemetery. There are now nearly 1,500, 1914-18 and a small number of 1939-45 war casualties commemorated in this site. The cemetery covers an area of 6,199 square metres.

In Memory of

KENNETH EVERARD MATHER

Private
1045181
20th Bn., Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regt.)
who died on
Thursday, 8th August 1918. Age 24.

Additional Information: Son of Edwin Ernest and Alice Ada Mather, of Bristol.

Commemorative Information

Cemetery: CRUCIFIX CORNER CEMETERY, VILLERS-BRETONNEUX, Somme, France
Grave Reference/
Panel Number:
I. D. 17.
Location: Villers-Bretonneux is a village in the Department of the Somme, and lies on the N29 road from Amiens to St Quentin. Enter the village of Villers-Bretonneux on the D23 heading south. At the crossroads head in the direction of Demuin and Mozeuil, remaining on the D23. Two CWGC signposts will be seen. On leaving the village, carry on south for 2 kilometres, still on the D23 Demuin road. After passing over the A29 Motorway (Amiens-St Quentin), the cemetery is signposted down a side road on the right.

Historical Information: The site became famous in 1918, when the German advance on Amiens ended (on the 23rd April) in the capture of Villers-Bretonneux by German tanks and infantry. On the following day the 4th Australian and 5th Australian Divisions, with units of the 8th and 18th Divisions, carried out "an enterprise of great daring",* and recaptured the whole of the village. The Cemetery was begun by the Canadian Corps in August, 1918, and closed in the same month; the original British Cemetery (now Plot I, Rows A to D) contained 90 burials, and French troops buried in Plot II at the same time. The Cemetery was greatly enlarged after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the battlefields between the Somme and the Luce. There are now over 650, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, nearly 200 are unidentified and memorials are erected to one soldier from the United Kingdom and one from Australia, known or believed to be buried among them. Sixteen American, 241 French and ten German graves have since been removed to other places of burial. The Cemetery covers an area of 3,012 square metres and is enclosed by a curb. A ruined Crucifix, from which the place was named, is near the entrance. The only considerable British burial ground concentrated into this cemetery was:- VAIRE WOOD CEMETERY, VAIRE-SOUS-CORBIE, near the West side of the Bois de Vaire. Here were buried 26 soldiers from Australia and one from the United Kingdom who fell in July and August, 1918. * Sir Douglas Haig's Despatch of the 20th July, 1918.

In Memory of

ERIC FRANK PACKHAM

Second Lieutenant
Army Service Corps
attd. 2nd Bn., Hampshire Regiment
who died on
Friday, 1st November 1918.

Commemorative Information

Cemetery: CROFTON (HOLY ROOD) OLD CHURCHYARD, Hampshire, United Kingdom

In Memory of

OSWALD FOLLETT SIMS 

Private
24644
1st Bn., Hampshire Regiment
who died on
Monday 22nd January 1917. Age 19.

Citation:

Additional Information: Son of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Sims, of The School House, Bishop's Waltham, Hants.

Commemorative Information
-
Cemetery: GROVE TOWN CEMETERY, MEAULTE, Somme, France
Grave Reference/Panel Number: II. M. 8.
Location: Meaulte is a village a little south of Albert. Leave Albert by heading south-east on the D329 in the direction of Meaulte. Go through the village of Meulte in the direction of Bray-sur-Somme. After leaving Meulte, 2.5 kilometres down the road turn right towards Etinehem (C6) heading south. The first CWGC signpost is at this turn off. Follow the C6 for 0.8 kilometres and then follow the second CWGC signpost indicating a right turn down a dirt track. Carry straight on down the dirt track for 0.4 kilometres and Grove Town British Cemetery is on the left hand side of this track.
-
Historical Information: In September 1916, the 34th and 2/2nd London Casualty Clearing Stations were established at this point, known to the troops as Grove Town, to deal with casualties from the Somme battlefields. They were moved in April 1917 and, except for a few burials in August and September 1918, the cemetery was closed. Grove Town Cemetery contains 1,392 First World War burials. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

 

In Memory of

JOHN BOASE THOMAS

Lieutenant
Royal Flying Corps
who died on
Wednesday, 23rd January 1918. Age 20.

Additional Information: Son of the late John Boase Thomas, of Poplars, Curdridge, Hants.

Commemorative Information

Cemetery: MAALA CEMETERY, Yemen

In Memory of

GORDON CHARLES WELLSTEAD

Lance Corporal
47845
6th Bn., Wiltshire Regiment
who died on
Saturday, 28th September 1918. Age 20.

Additional Information: Son of Charles and Naomi Ruth Wellstead, of Abshott Rd., Titchfield Common, Fareham, Hants. Born Locks Heath, Southampton.

During the First World War, the village of Lijssenthoek was situated on the main communication line between the Allied military bases in the rear and the Ypres battlefields. Close to the Front, but out of the extreme range of most German field artillery, it became a natural place to establish casualty clearing stations. The cemetery was first used by the French 15th Hopital D'Evacuation and in June 1915, it began to be used by casualty clearing stations of the Commonwealth forces. From April to August 1918, the casualty clearing stations fell back before the German advance and field ambulances (including a French ambulance) took their places. The cemetery contains 9,893 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, a few of which were brought in from the battlefields after the Armistice, and 883 war graves of other nationalities, mostly French and German. It is the second largest Commonwealth cemetery in Belgium. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

 

 

 

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